Archive for October, 2013

Here is the first article I wrote for the Highlands Newspaper a few years back….I thought I’d share it.

Research shows us that the number one reported reason for physical inactivity among adults is the lack of time to exercise. Most adults are conflicted with working and raising families either in single parent homes or homes which both parents work. Many adults spend their days commuting to work and dragging their children across town to school and extracurricular activities. By the end of the day, most people just do not have time to exercise…Supposedly…
I have two arguments with research regarding this issue and it stems from the fact that the research is based on the individual’s perception of their time. My first argument is that we all only have 24 hours in a day and most people have numerous activities that fill their day. Yet there are plenty of people who get the recommended amount of exercise each week. There are CEO’s of major companies who work long hours, raise families and still manage to squeeze in sufficient amounts of exercise. I see super mom’s and super dad’s all the time who run a small business, work at a school, or work for private companies that find a way to make time for exercise. So, why can’t everyone find time to exercise?
My second argument against adults who claim they don’t have time to exercise is that they still find time to watch television or get on Facebook. I am guilty of this, I spend way too much time watching television and on the computer and I always complain about not having enough time. I would be willing to bet that if people would turn off the TV’s and computers at home and spent that time exercising they would exceed the recommendations for physical activity suggested by health organizations. I feel that it is not that people do not have the time to exercise, but it is more that they choose not to spend their time being physically active.
For those who still feel like they do not have enough time to exercise, here is some good news….It does not take that much time being physically active to gain major health benefits. The CDC suggests 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity and two days of total body resistance training each week. That breaks down to 30 minutes a day if your workouts are efficient. If you feel like you do not have 30 minutes a day, workout harder! If you participate in activities that are intense enough to make it difficult to carry on a conversation you can cut the 150 minutes of aerobic activity to 75 minutes, which is only 15 minutes a day. I think we can all find 15 minutes a day to help prevent things like heart disease and cancer so we can stay around a little longer for our friends and family….or is there not enough time in your day?

Labor Day Swim

Posted: October 10, 2013 in Articles, Exercises, Thought of the Day
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On Labor Day, Diana Nyad completed her childhood dream of swimming the more than one hundred mile distance between Cuba and the Florida Keys, becoming the first person to do so without a protective cage. Not only did Nyad have to complete this journey without a protective cage, for her record to be official, she had to swim continuously until the journey was complete. This requirement caused eating and staying hydrated to be a difficult task. Additionally, staying awake for fifty three hours straight was a bit of a challenge as well. Perhaps the most difficult part of Nyad’s swim was the large amount of salt water she ingested with every breath caused by the protective jellyfish mask she wore, which put her in a severely dehydrated state.

To me, act of athleticism did not seem like much fun. Initially, this appeared to be a senseless act to accomplish a personal goal and not to mention, downright crazy. I told one of my clients that if they ever hear about me participating in such a heroic endeavor, to find me and remind me that it is not something I want to do. Conversely, the truth is there is much to learn from Nyad’s swim. The truth is I have nothing but respect for what was accomplished. The efforts put into preparing for the swim and the extreme conditions that were endured are something we all should admire.

However, what I admire most about Nyad’s Labor Day swim is that she completed this swim on her fifth try and at sixty four years of age. Let me be clear, I do not feel sixty four is old. Undoubtedly, Diana Nyad has proven that. But, I don’t think any of us would blame a sixty four year old for giving up on such a physically exhausting goal, especially after failing on four previous attempts over the past thirty five years. But, she didn’t give up. She continued to improve both mentally and physically. Nyad didn’t care that she was sixty four; she simply wanted to get better. She wanted to accomplish a goal, set a record and catch the dream she had been chasing since she was eight!

While Nyad’s swim was a bit crazy, it was not just a senseless act to accomplish a personal goal. Nyad swam to inspire us to not give up and to prove that we are never too old to chase our dreams. Many of us may not be old or ever dream of attempting a physical feat such as previously described. But, I hope we are at least inspired to undertake a new task which may have previously seemed unattainable, continue to work on a previous goal that may have become too challenging and realize that we shouldn’t let trivial difficulties get in the way of things that would be beneficial, fun and enjoyable.

Here is a sneak peak of an article I just wrote for my new job in Palm Beach!

As golfers, each time we go out on the course we want to improve upon the performance of our previous round. Many of us will practice the various aspects of our game for hours in hopes of improving our score one or two strokes. Also, to assure that we are playing our best golf we research, experiment with and analyze the equipment we use to find the optimal clubs, balls and other golf paraphernalia that will put us in the best position to play well.

While practice and equipment are certainly very important parts of a good golf game, an investment in the performance of one’s own body may be the most important aspect of golf. Unfortunately this is often times overlooked. In order to play elite golf, simply having an able body is not enough. If focused practice and good equipment was all a golfer needed to be great, we would all be great at golf. The biggest difference between a professional golfer on the tour and the guy who cannot get on the tour is the difference in what they can do with their body. They both have access to top equipment, and spend hours practicing their golf game, however one achieves success and the other does not. Therefore, the golfer needs to have their body functioning in its top condition to really have an advantage.

The good news is scientific research and lots of experience is showing us what forms of exercise work best for golfers. Programs such as the Titleist Performance Institute and the National Academy of Sports Medicine are giving us great information as to how to screen golfers for weaknesses and mobility restrictions which directly impact golf game. This year we have comprised a golf fitness team here at Lost Tree which is more than qualified to help maximize your body’s potential, so you can get the most out of your golf swing. We will be offering group exercise classes, special one on one personal training sessions for pre golf warm ups, golf movement screens and much more. Please contact the Lost Tree Spa and Fitness Center for more information and keep an eye out for informational sessions about golf fitness.